The ‘Trèfle de Compiègne’ Brooch,
Purchased by Napoleon III,
Designed by Maison Chaumet,
Paris,
1853
Diamonds, gold and emeralds
© Maison Chaumet, Paris

 

The ‘Trèfle de Compiègne’ Brooch,
Purchased by Napoleon III,
Designed by Maison Chaumet,
Paris,
1853
Diamonds, gold and emeralds
© Maison Chaumet, Paris

 

Gospel of 17 March 2022

Feast of Saint Patrick

Luke 10:1-12,17-20

The Lord appointed seventy-two others and sent them out ahead of him, in pairs, to all the towns and places he himself was to visit. He said to them, ‘The harvest is rich but the labourers are few, so ask the Lord of the harvest to send labourers to his harvest. Start off now, but remember, I am sending you out like lambs among wolves. Carry no purse, no haversack, no sandals. Salute no one on the road.

‘Whatever house you go into, let your first words be, “Peace to this house!” And if a man of peace lives there, your peace will go and rest on him; if not, it will come back to you. Stay in the same house, taking what food and drink they have to offer, for the labourer deserves his wages; do not move from house to house.

‘Whenever you go into a town where they make you welcome, eat what is set before you. Cure those in it who are sick, and say, “The kingdom of God is very near to you.” But whenever you enter a town and they do not make you welcome, go out into its streets and say, “We wipe off the very dust of your town that clings to our feet, and leave it with you. Yet be sure of this: the kingdom of God is very near.” I tell you, on that day it will not go as hard with Sodom as with that town.’

The seventy-two came back rejoicing. ‘Lord,’ they said ‘even the devils submit to us when we use your name.’ He said to them, ‘I watched Satan fall like lightning from heaven. Yes, I have given you power to tread underfoot serpents and scorpions and the whole strength of the enemy; nothing shall ever hurt you. Yet do not rejoice that the spirits submit to you; rejoice rather that your names are written in heaven.’

Reflection on the Diamond & Emerald Brooch

Happy Saint Patrick’s day! Patrick was born in 5th-century Britain into a Romanised family. Aged 16, he was captured by Irish raiders from the villa of his father, Calpurnius, a deacon and minor local official. He was taken into slavery in Ireland where he would spend six years as a herdsman. It is during this time that he discovered his faith. Upon dreaming that the ship in which he was to escape was ready, he fled his master and returned to Britain. After being reunited with his family, Patrick had a dream in which one Victoricus delivered him a letter headed “The Voice of the Irish.” In his Confessio, Saint Patrick writes: "I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: 'The Voice of the Irish.' As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea-and they cried out, as with one voice: 'We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.’” The dream prompted young Patrick to apply for the priesthood. He was ordained by St. Germanus, the Bishop of Auxerre, and was later ordained a bishop and sent to take the Gospel to Ireland. He arrived in Slane, Ireland on 15 March 433. The rest is history. 

As Saint Patrick often used shamrocks to explain the Holy Trinity, our artwork depicts a shamrock. The people of Ireland had never heard of the Trinity, and could not understand how there could be three Persons in one God. So Patrick used a shamrock to explain this mystery to them, saying that every shamrock has three distinct leaves (the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit), but they are all part of the very same shamrock (the One Godhead).

The emerald and diamond shamrock brooch was designed by jewellers Chaumet in Paris, who had been the appointed jewellers for sovereigns since the beginning of the 19th century. Napoleon III invited Eugénie de Montijo to his residence at the Château de Compiègne in the fall of 1852. One early morning, during a walk in the park with Napoleon, Eugenie marvelled at a clover covered with morning dewdrops. So Napoleon III ordered this this ‘Trèfle de Compiègne’ brooch as the engagement gift when he asked her to marry him. 

Share this Gospel Reading

Did you like this Gospel reading and art reflection?

Join in the discussion about this artwork & Gospel reading

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Readings related to Luke 10:1-12,17-20

17 July 2022

Luke 10:38-42

Martha works; Mary listens

5 October 2020

Luke 10:25-37

The Good Samaritan

5 October 2021

Luke 10:38-42

Martha works; Mary listens

17 March 2023

Luke 10:1-12,17-20

Saint Patrick's Day

Join our community

In addition to receiving our Daily Gospel Reading and Art Reflection, signing up for a free membership allows you to: 

The mission of Christian Art is to offer a daily Gospel Reading paired with a related work of art and a short reflection. Our goal is to help people grow closer to God through the magnificent pairing of art and the Christian faith.

CONNECT WITH US

Join over 70,000 people who receive our daily Gospel Reading and Art Reflection

Skip to content