The Holy Martyr Maximilian Kolbe,
Artwork by Antonio Girardi,
Painted in 1984,
Oil on canvas
© Alamy

The Holy Martyr Maximilian Kolbe,
Artwork by Antonio Girardi,
Painted in 1984,
Oil on canvas
© Alamy

Gospel of 14 August 2023

Feast of Saint Maximilian Kolbe

Matthew 17:22-27

One day when they were together in Galilee, Jesus said to his disciples, ‘The Son of Man is going to be handed over into the power of men; they will put him to death, and on the third day he will be raised to life again.’ And a great sadness came over them.

When they reached Capernaum, the collectors of the half-shekel came to Peter and said, ‘Does your master not pay the half-shekel?’ ‘Oh yes’ he replied, and went into the house. But before he could speak, Jesus said, ‘Simon, what is your opinion? From whom do the kings of the earth take toll or tribute? From their sons or from foreigners?’ And when he replied, ‘From foreigners’, Jesus said, ‘Well then, the sons are exempt. However, so as not to offend these people, go to the lake and cast a hook; take the first fish that bites, open its mouth and there you will find a shekel; take it and give it to them for me and for you.’

Reflection on the painting

Today we celebrate the Feast of Saint Maximilian Kolbe. Saint Maximilian Kolbe (born Raymund Kolbe) was a Polish Conventual Franciscan Friar. During the German occupation of Poland, he remained at Niepokalanów a monastery which helped to hide, feed and clothe 3,000 Polish refugees, (of which approximately 1,500 were Jews). In 1941, their newspaper “The Knight of the Immaculate” offered strong criticism of the Nazis.

In 1941, he was arrested by the Gestapo for hiding Jewish people and sent to Auschwitz, where in the most horrific of settings he continued to work as a priest and offer solace to fellow inmates. On June 15, he was even able to send a letter to his mother which reads:

Dear Mama, At the end of the month of May I was transferred to the camp of Auschwitz. Everything is well in my regard. Be tranquil about me and about my health, because the good God is everywhere and provides for everything with love. It would be well that you do not write to me until you will have received other news from me, because I do not know how long I will stay here. Cordial greetings and kisses, affectionately. Raymund.”

In July 1941, three prisoners appeared to have escaped from the camp; as a result, the Deputy Commander of Auschwitz ordered 10 men to be chosen to be starved to death in an underground bunker. When one of the selected men Franciszek Gajowniczek heard he was selected, he cried out “My wife! My children!” At this point, Kolbe volunteered to take his place, and he would lead the men in prayer and singing hymns to Mary. From the underground cell in which they were shut up there continually arose the echo of prayers, songs and canticles. They all died shortly after. Franciszek Gajowniczek would miraculously survive Auschwitz, and would later be present at Kolbe’s canonisation in 1982.

Saint Maximilian Kolbe, pray for us.

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Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago

This Bible passage seems to relate Jesus performing a magician’s trick, not really a miracle. I read that finding a coin in a fish’s mouth was quite a popular magician’s trick at that time in the Holy Land. Does this story occur in any other Gospel?
Sorry if I’m shocking anyone.

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

I agree it’s an odd one. Maybe Jesus was having a joke? I don’t know if it unique to Matthew- maybe someone else will enlighten us?

Anthony
Member
Anthony
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Interestingly, Jesus told Simon Peter what to do. Jesus himself did not leave the house or touch the fish.

Zeffi
Member
Zeffi
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Surely magicians’ tricks are a form of lying? Jesus does not tell lies.
And yes, this miracle is found only in St Matthew’s Gospel.

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Zeffi

Thank you Zeffi- does not call its veracity into account.

Pauline Wood
Member
Pauline Wood
8 months ago

I have been moved to feeling a deep gravity by today’s scriptures and artwork after the froth of my son’s birthday celebrations over the weekend. And good that it is so I think. The accompanying reading today from Deuteronomy 10:12-22 speaks of the seriousness and unequivocal sovereignty of God’s reality and of His commands, and importantly that we are to ‘love the stranger’, to ‘circumcise our hearts’ and to be ‘obstinate no longer’. He is not subject in any way to man’s laws and even though He will be handed over to the power of men that power will not and cannot prevail. It is a caught fish that provides the tax so as not offend. God is gracious but not subject.

The painting depicting St. Maximilian Mary Kolbe is stark and unequivocal also. The power of men has consumed nature but not God. A light from heaven blesses Kolbe’s head. His dignity and faith are concentrated in the brightness of his face. An illuminated nobility and kindness that shines out in the worst of man’s grim kingdom. He hasn’t paid the tax either – that exchange of man made currency that exists in parallel to God’s own.

The barbed wire lines that draw our eye in to focus of Kolbe’s halo-like head are again reminiscent of Christ’s thorny crown. I think a lot of artists consider using that device in their works to weave the suffering of such a situation to Christ’s own Passion, to unite our suffering to the salvation offered by His, transforming it into redemption.

I wonder if the figure at the front alludes to Franciszek Gajowniczek who’s place was taken by Kolbe? He is on the outside of the wire having been given a chance at life. We can’t see his face of course just his posture of hopelessness and perhaps a sad gratitude in the face of such horror and yet outstanding compassion. Which is of course our own position in front of the Cross.

I’m to Mass now and will take all this with me. St. Maximilian Kolbe – pray for us!

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  Pauline Wood

Excellent reflection Pauline. I’m so happy that there are still some Christian people out there who have the depth and spirituality to come up with a commentary like yours! I couldn’t…

Anthony
Member
Anthony
8 months ago

In the face of this man and his life and sacrifice I’m lost for words, except; “pray for me.”

Patricia O'Brien
Member
Patricia O'Brien
8 months ago

Maximilian’s calm is the truly saintly thing; he knows he is loved by God. Nothing else (even suffering and death) matters.

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago

Maximilian Kolbe is one of my favourite saints. I have a visceral reaction to anything to do with the holocaust. For ten years our neighbours were a Polish/Austrian Jewish couple who had escaped just before the war; but he had been imprisoned, and she had gone through terrible humiliations to get him released. As a result, he was an embittered man, his freedom was bought, for him, at too high a price. Kolbe’s serenity was because he knew the Lord was with him in every circumstance, and no price was too high to pay for reflecting his Lord’s love. The painting is nearly beyond words: its austerity reflects the terrible deprivation of the setting, the fence wires disappearing into the distance evoke the train tracks leading to the camp gates. All the emotion is poured into the body of the emaciated child, held Pietà-like in Maximilian’s arms, and the hunched father. The saint’s face is other-worldly, as if seeing beyond; and, if I may say so, slightly off true in its setting on his neck, giving a further touch of unreality – which is often our reaction to the camps, to the Shoah: how could this be? We know how, but “humankind cannot bear too much reality”.
I’m being slow to grasp the significance of the gospel reading, partly because of being overwhelmed by the story of Saint Maximilian. Look forward to your takes on it, CArters. May we find the peace of God in whatever today brings, in small things especially, as life is often a series of small things, but nothing so small it cannot be blessed or a blessing. 🌻

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago

There is much to see and wonder at in this painting. The strange, smoke heavy sky, the familiar profile of the buildings we should all be acquainted with, the dead tree on the right, contrasted with the fencing on the left. The beloved Saint stands within an open space indicating the freedom of his spirit despite his imprisonment. He is dignified and challenging in his gaze to pick up and carry our own wounded, especially the children. The child, only half clothed in the red of martyrdom, whilst the martyr himself wears the grey camp uniform. For me, though, it is the inclusion of the figure in front that intrigues me. His hunched, faceless and hopeless figure contasts sharply with Kolbe’s. This figure seems twice imprisoned and separated from the strength and freedom conveyed by the saint. Also he sits on a rock, natural as the tree but oddly apart. What the artist is attempting to show here intigues me- is the hunched man inside or outside the camp? I await your responses with interest!

This reading is also intriguing, and similarly in two sections I’m struggling to connect. In the first part Jesus warns the disciples about what is to happen, and they rightly feel sad. Then we jump quickly to Peter’s question. This reminds me of the ‘rendering to Caesar’ reading we find later. Jesus seems to be saying pay your taxes but in such a way that keeps wordly things at arm’s length from spiritual things. Anyone else think this?
I first found out about Maximillion Kolbe as a teenager, before his canonisation, so his story is familiar to me, although I had forgotten the sheer brutality of the nature of his death, and indeed the deaths of the others involved. You cannot read this story without wanting to be both a part of it in your heart and human feeling, whilst mentally backing away from such horror that makes us too uncomfortable.

We should not separate ourselves from the compassion we feel, nor should we feel ourselves incapable of such evil actions. The pure and the vile live in all of us and all can do is pray that our depravity against our fellow men is never tested in this way.

Kolbe stands like a beacon, and there must have been many more like him we never hear about. ‘Saint Maximilian pray for us and continue to shine the light of your example, that we will raise our downcast hearts and minds to the light of the truth you embodied in your life and sacrifice.’

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  spaceforgrace

Very well put SFG. This morning the Bible passage is not inspiring me I’m afraid to say….

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

It must be there for a reason. Father Patrick gives us no insight. I blame the liturgical calendar lol- which is a complex mechanism and means some readings are included only every few years!

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago

This is a truly inspiring story. What goodness, what strength, what resolve, what steadfastness, what example, what everything!
Talking of his being offered two crowns by the Mother of God I once knew a holy nun who had a similar offer. She was in a coma from the growing cancer in her when she had a dream of her future which consisted of chosing a brightly lit path or a path in shadows. She said to herself that she already had the light, Jesus, so she would take the shadows. She then came out of the coma and carried on with this life and her work. She believed that had she chosen the brightly lit path she would have been united then with her Lord.

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago

Hello anyone interested in checking out some digital art to see if you might be able to get into it/appreciate it (due to yesterday’s artwork being digital and many saying they don’t like digital art). Noelle, this is specifically for you, dear, because you expressed being open to it. 🌻 I re-researched what I had referenced yesterday, and I have provided 4 links currently waiting for the moderator’s approval. If you want to see them, go to yesterday’s gospel readying, scroll down 1/2 to 2/3 down page 1 of comments, and you will see a longer post replying to Noelle. The links take you to websites with very good examples of digital art of all kinds. Sorry for treading on today’s reading and art with this info, but I realize people don’t tend to go back in time with posts, so I could not think of how to get this information to you otherwise.

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Thank you very much, Christine, for taking the time and trouble to do this research for us, I shall certainly take a look. Really, do “have a nice day”. I struggle with our weather in the UK, to use an Irish expression, it’s “blowing a hooly” here, and raining cats and dogs, too, so I hope you have something more cheerful where you are: “The Lord make His face to shine upon you and be gracious unto you.” ☀️☀️🌻

Anthony
Member
Anthony
8 months ago
Reply to  Noelle Clemens

Same with the weather here Noelle. But as we say up here, No rain, no lakes!

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago
Reply to  Anthony

Nice one! Here it’s no rain, no pasture.. 🐂🌻

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago

Good day to all! May we all have a good will today to do what the Lord wants for us! I am doing reverse engineering today. I was so stricken by the shockingly beautiful painting – eery and inspiring, haunting and gorgeous – that I immediately researched this great Saint. Admittedly, the Gospel reading is beautiful but difficult, and I look forward to reading all of your ponderings and interpretations. In tribute, and out of respect, for this amazing Saint, I learned and want to share these facts about him (reference included):

“St. Maximilian Kolbe was very active in promoting the Immaculate Virgin Mary and is known as the Apostle of Consecration to Mary. Much of his life was strongly influenced by a vision he had of the Virgin Mary when he was 12.
“That night I asked the Mother of God what was to become of me. Then she came to me holding two crowns, one white, the other red. She asked me if I was willing to accept either of these crowns. The white one meant that I should persevere in purity, and the red that I should become a martyr. I said that I would accept them both.” (Catholic Online, at catholic.org – following info is from the article, but paraphrased and edited for you)

He and older brother Frances joined the Conventional Franciscans the next year. He organized the Militia Immaculata (Army of the Immaculate One) after witnessing demonstrations against 2 popes, with his goal to convert sinners and enemies of the Church– especially the Freemasons.

He was ordained a priest in 1918 and promoted Mary throughout Poland. He started to publish religious periodicals at this time. He went on to found monasteries in Japan and India. At the “young age” of around 40, his poor health forced a return to Poland. He was one of the few who remained in the monastery after Germans invaded. He opened up a temporary hospital, and then when his town was captured, he was sent to prison but released after 3 months.

Kolbe refused to sign a document stating he was a German citizen (he had German ancestry), and he continued to work in his monastery. His monastery sheltered refugees and hid about 2000 Jews. He continued to publish, including anti-German articles. The monastery was closed on 2/17/1941, and Kolbe was put into the Pawiak prison for 3 months, and then transferred to Auschwitz. He faced severe violence. After 2 months there, the Germans selected men to starve to death as a warning not to escape. Kolbe volunteered to take the place of a man who had a family.

At the end of his life, it is said that Kolbe stayed calm and led prayers to Our Lady. He was given a lethal injection after about 2 weeks – which is a long time to endure starvation/dehydration (fyi – my own dad died after about 5 days, so 2 weeks is a really long time). According to the handed down stories, Kolbe calmy waited death as he raised his left arm for the shot.

CArters, I know this is a sad, tragic story, and the painting is tough, but we know that this great Saint made it to heaven and has a special position there, so don’t be sad. Have an uplifting day and devote it to our Lord. ❤️🕊️🌞 Today I pray especially for those addicted to drugs. May they feel the strength of Saint Maximilian Kolbe and feel the bonds of addiction loosen. 💪🙏🪢

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Thank you for this informative and insightful comment Christine.

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago
Reply to  spaceforgrace

My pleasure, spaceforgrace!

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Christine, I have never quite understood the Church’s oppossition to the Freemasons. Okay it’s not Christian. Perhaps others know something.

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Hey Chazbo, I like your question! This intrigues me too. I did a quick search and found a couple articles (I have only quickly skimmed at this point). I am going to send you the links in a moment, and then I will read the article too later. The moderator will delay the post, so check back probably in an hour or so? Thank you for bringing this up. I otherwise would not have learned about it, and I enjoy this subject matter. (Boy, this is what makes this special artsy community so awesome!)

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Christine and Chazbo, buenos dias. My father and brother never got on cos my uncle was a freemason. I’ve skimmed a few websites, and all seem opaque, I couldn’t gather what freemasonry is really about. I know it is forbidden to Catholics. In fact, I was so depressed by what I did see that I fled back to the Apostles’ and the Nicene creed, and was much comforted. IND 🌻

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Chazbo, as promised, below are links to 2 articles about the Catholic Church and the Freemasons, and please note that the first link is a much more timely article from 2020, while the second may be a bit outdated (1996) but perhaps still the actual “official” teaching/position of the Catholic Church. I also include a briefer article in full below.

1) https://insidethevatican.com/magazine/new-openings-to-make-masonic-membership-permissible/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwoeemBhCfARIsADR2QCtqXTdAA5zA2Ko2Fd1eu926tjLCg2KWaTJ5y08ySaAOkdXKBhyQc1kaAoxpEALw_wcB

2) https://www.ewtn.com/catholicism/library/what-are-the-masons-are-catholics-allowed-to-belong-to-this-organization-1174

And for those who don’t want to read the articles/look up links, here is a briefer article, quoted in full from “Catholic Answers” in 1993:

“What is the Catholic Church’s official position on Freemasonry? Are Catholics free to become Freemasons?

“Freemasonry is incompatible with the Catholic faith. Freemasonry teaches a naturalistic religion that espouses indifferentism, the position that a person can be equally pleasing to God while remaining in any religion.

“Masonry is a parallel religion to Christianity. The ‘New Catholic Encyclopedia’ states, ‘Freemasonry displays all the elements of religion, and as such it becomes a rival to the religion of the Gospel. It includes temples and altars, prayers, a moral code, worship, vestments, feast days, the promise of reward and punishment in the afterlife, a hierarchy, and initiative and burial rites’ (vol. 6, p. 137).

“Masonry is also a secret society. Its initiates subscribe to secret blood oaths that are contrary to Christian morals. The prospective Mason swears that if he ever reveals the secrets of Masonry—secrets which are trivial and already well-known—he wills to be subject to self-mutilation or to gruesome execution. (Most Masons, admittedly, never would dream of carrying out these punishments on themselves or on an errant member).

“Historically, one of Masonry’s primary objectives has been the destruction of the Catholic Church; this is especially true of Freemasonry as it has existed in certain European countries. In the United States, Freemasonry is often little more than a social club, but it still espouses a naturalistic religion that contradicts orthodox Christianity. (Those interested in joining a men’s club should consider the Knights of Columbus instead.)

“The Church has imposed the penalty of excommunication on Catholics who become Freemasons. The penalty of excommunication for joining the Masonic Lodge was explicit in the 1917 code of canon law (canon 2335), and it is implicit in the 1983 code (canon 1374).

“Because the revised code of canon law is not explicit on this point, some drew the mistaken conclusion that the Church’s prohibition of Freemasonry had been dropped. As a result of this confusion, shortly before the 1983 code was promulgated, the Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued a statement indicating that the penalty was still in force. This statement was dated November 26, 1983 and may be found in ‘Origins’ 13/27 (Nov. 15, 1983), 450.”

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Thank you Christine. I was quite ignorant on these matters and now I can quite see why Freemasonry is not a good organisation to belong to. I belong to an organisation for men that has been described as a kind of Catholic masonry which it isn’t. The Catenians.

John Hobbs
Member
John Hobbs
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Some years ago, when all of the Dan Brown stuff was in its ascendency, a fellow student told me of two Catholic, quasi-masonic groups, theKnights of St Columba and Opus Dei. One he described as Catholics pretending to be gentlemen and the other, gentlemen pretending to be Catholics? I can’t remember which way round, which is probably a good thing less I offend anyone.
My starting point is to look back at the original purpose of the lodges, guilds etc., where knowledge could be shared and camaraderie established. But then, it would have been hard to resist the lure of protectionism that comes with that – what we would call a cartel today?
Once that kind of corruption starts, it starts to go wider than the trade or profession itself and permeates into other aspects of life where loyalties are expected to prevail over the natural order of society, in particular, justice! Because the church was integrated with the state, I imagine that members of these organisations felt the need to justify being above all that. So they came up with their own Deist take on the world, where astronomy and geometry would rank with or prevail over divinity.
Some confusion arose on the 70s when certain order in our church, in Austria for example, started to go a bit soft and indicated tolerance where a lodge was not actually anti the church, so to speak. As Christine has pointed out, the church has since clarified its position on lack of compatibility.
Working in the public sector, I have a strong aversion to the whole notion of freemasonry. At its worst, it seems like the antithesis of selflessness, the key message in today’s art.
And I would always have my doubts about groups of men who roll their trouser legs up, don leather aprons and play Oui-Je boards on a Saturday afternoon when there’s some perfectly good sport to watch or whatever normal activity floats your boat!
I hope the Great Architect of the Universe isn’t watching! Best, John

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  John Hobbs

Very good John. Opus Dei is a big subject – a type of intense Catholicism which is not for everyone. But I do know some good people in ‘The Work’ as it’s known. The Knights of Columbus is an American male fraternity which is quite harmless. Dan Brown’s books are farrago of piffle!! (as Boris would say).

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  John Hobbs

I love this reply John- what I might have said if I could have been bothered lol!

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

It is an endless path to nothingness, I feel. My daughter did a project on freemasonry in her teens as she was fascinated by it. It is all puff and air I think, if you want to waste time on it.

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  spaceforgrace

Well I know they give each other a leg up and it’s meant to be big in the police. It was very popular in C18 Austria and Germany – indeed I believe Mozart was a mason and still a member of the Catholic Church. I’ll have to read some more.

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

Good luck!

Bashia Ferrando
Bashia Ferrando
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Good morning. I will add the following to the above which is quite poignant extract taken from Father James Mary:
When he was in the starvation bunker and being starved to death with 9 other prisioners he was always leading them in the Rosary and always trying to encourage them not to give in to despair but to trust in the Immaculate Heart of Mary who would help all of them with all of her graces to be able to endure this passion and this suffering with great fortitude. He managed through his own priestly example to be able to keep them calm in what was obviously a very desperate situation.

Some of the eye witnesses who were guards of that bunker where all those souls were starved to death gave eye witness accounts and they were simply mesmerised really by the profound peace as they looked into the bunker especially the peace on the face of Father Maximilian Mary’s and one of those guards became a Catholic soon after because of the beautiful example of Father Maximilian Mary. St Maximilian Kolbe pray for us.

The painting reminds me of the current immigrants who risk their lives to cross the Channel and arrive in England and are placed in what looks like a camp. Some make it and some don’t and there is Maximilian Kolbe holding a lifeless child who didn’t make it, the father of the child unconsolable. Maximilian’s eyes pleading mercy and love for the helpless like saying how can we allow this. Just thinking about it brings tears to my eyes.
Maximilian Kolbe’s love was unconditional. Maximilian Kolbe pray for us. May you all have a blessed day.

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago

Bashia – sorry to add a note of dissent but in no minuscule way can the situation of illegal migrants into this country be compared to the what happened to European Jewry at the hands of the Nazis.

Bashia Ferrando
Bashia Ferrando
8 months ago
Reply to  Chazbo M

I agree entirely. . It was a terrible time and it should never happen again. But I was not comparing what happened then to the current situation of immigrants. It is only my interpretation of the painting how I see it.

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago

I understood your point clearly Bashia. Compassion in a cruel world shines like a jewels, whatever the cause.

spaceforgrace
Member
spaceforgrace
8 months ago

A great point- I thought of Alan Kurdi- the little boy washed up on the Turkish beach when I saw this. We have much to be ashamed of. God bless you Bashia.

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago

Thank you, Bashia. The current situation, in which the poor of Africa flee north to avoid destitution, was predicted as far back as the 30’s, if I remember correctly, by an author called Charles Williams. What we see as a problem has very deep roots, and no very obvious solution…. but we have to bring our compassion, and the compassion of our Lord to bear, where we can…Lord, please shine your light and show us the way. Amen. 🌻

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago
Reply to  Noelle Clemens

Of course we must be compassionate but I worry how this is going to end. The rise of extremism? Growing racism and eventual simply turning the boats back. Probably beyond my lifetime but it is a worry. I suppose we shouldn’t look ahead and worry, it doesn’t help and this is not such a good topic for CA I suppose….

Noelle Clemens
Member
Noelle Clemens
8 months ago
Reply to  Christine H

Thank you, Christine, for filling us in on the background, so helpful. 🌻

Maria Contreras
Member
Maria Contreras
8 months ago

En este mundo secularizado, Maximiliano Kolbe es un ejemplo de fe y amor. San Maximiliano ruega por nosotros.

Christine H
Christine H
8 months ago

Si, San Maximiliano ruega por nosotros. Amen. 🙏🙏🙏

Chazbo M
Member
Chazbo M
8 months ago

Pray for us Saint Maximilian.

Anthony
Member
Anthony
8 months ago

I don’t speak Spanish but I think I can work that out as; In a secular world Maximilian Kolbe is an example of faith and love. St. M. pray for us.

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